MIKE HEDGES AM URGES LOCAL FISHERMAN TO REPORT ANY SIGHTINGS OR CATCHES OF PINK SALMON IN SWANSEA RIVERS.

MIKE HEDGES AM URGES LOCAL FISHERMAN TO REPORT ANY SIGHTINGS OR CATCHES OF PINK SALMON IN SWANSEA RIVERS.

Speaking from his Morriston Office, Mike Hedges AM said …’ it is rare for Pink Salmon to be caught in Welsh Rivers; it is important that NRW has a good picture of how the ecology of local rivers is evolving so if local anglers do see fish not usually seen in the Tawe or other local rivers, I would urge them to contact NRW and let them know what they have seen. You can report your catch –

Report your catch on NRW’s 24-hour incident hotline number 03000 65 3000’

Natural Resources Wales (NRW) is urging nets men and anglers to report any unusual catches after the first pink salmon was caught in Welsh waters for decades.
The fish was caught in the river Dee at the Chester fish trap monitoring station.
Despite this being a Welsh first, numerous reports of captured pink salmon were made around the UK in 2017.
The majority were caught in Scotland and off the north east coast of England with a few isolated reports on the UK’s west coast.
Data on sightings is vital to determine any potential impact on the local environment and species.
Pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha), also known as humpback salmon, originate from the northern Pacific Ocean.
The appearance of the species is of concern as it may impact on Wales’ indigenous salmon and sea trout populations in the future.
The potential impact of pink salmon is unclear at present; however, these fish may introduce parasites and disease not present in native salmonid fish.
Interbreeding is unlikely as pink salmon spawn in late summer and Atlantic salmon spawn in winter, however competition for food and space in nursery areas between juvenile pink and Atlantic salmon is possible.